Songs Sirin, Alkonost, Gamayun

Сирин, Алконост, Гамаюн

Sirin, Alkonost, Gamayun

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В жилищных конторах лесной полумрак;  
На крышах домов фонари с египетской тьмой:  
Тронулся лед - так часто бывает весной:  
Живущим на льдинах никто не сказал,  
Что может быть так...  
 
Откуда нам знать, что такое волна?  
Полуденный фавн, трепет русалок во тьме...  
Наступает ночь - начнем подготовку к зиме;  
И может быть, следующим, кто постучит  
К нам в дверь,  
Будет война...  
 
Я возьму на себя зеркала,  
Кто-то другой - хмель и трепетный вьюн...  
Все уже здесь: Сирин, Алконост, Гамаюн;  
Как мы условились, я буду ждать по ту  
Сторону стекла.  

Notes

Who, Who and Who?

What! You don't know your bird-creatures of Slavic Mythology? Tsk, tsk.

ALKONOST In Byzantine and Slavic legends of the Middle Ages, a heavenly bird with a human face (often mentioned at the same time as Sirin). The shape of Alkonost possibly derives the Greek myth of Alkion, who was changed by the gods into a kingfisher. Alkonost lays eggs on the seashore and, carrying them into the depths of the sea, keeps them safe for seven days, until the hatchlings hatch. The song of Alkonost is so lovely that those who hear it forget the rest of creation.

GAMAYUN Immortal bird, messenger of the Slavic gods, their herald, singing the divine hymns to mankind and depicting the future for those who are able to hear her secrets. When Gamayun flies, sunny weather gives way to deadly storms. Gamayun knows everything under the sun about the happenings of heaven and earth, gods and heroes, men and monsters, birds and beasts.

SIRIN Dark bird, malignant power, messenger of the rulers of the underworld. From head to waist Sirin is a woman of incomparable beauty; from the waist on she's a bird. He who hears her bewitching singing will forget about everything else and slowly die, and, what's more, doesn't even have the power not to listen to the deadly voice of Sirin, and an instantaneous death would have to be considered a blessing!

translated by Dzhon from The Dictionary of Slavic Mythology